149: Can The Wildatarian Diet Help Manage Your Chronic Conditions? w/ Teri Cochrane

149: Can The Wildatarian Diet Help Manage Your Chronic Conditions? w/ Teri Cochrane

by Anna Cabeca June 09, 2019

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We all know how important nutrition is for staying healthy. But did you know that if you’re not eating the right foods for your body, you might not be at your optimal health levels. This was a lesson today’s guest,Teri Cochrane, learned when she had her son.

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When Teri was first pregnant with her son, she was in an emotionally abusive relationship that was sending her stress hormones and adrenal levels through the roof. Her pregnant body began to rely on her son’s adrenals, and as a result, when he was born, she was told he was going to have health problems and stunted growth his entire life.

Teri began exploring whether food was having a negative impact on her son, and discovered there were a few triggers. Once she removed these from his diet, she began experimenting on other concepts. And it was when her daughter became severely ill and lost her period, that she started to study health and nutrition in earnest.

So many bodies, especially those with chronic conditions, have difficulty processing protein, fat, and sulfates. That’s why Teri developed the Wildatarian diet. The Wildatarian diet is used to support people who have chronic medical conditions. Each way of eating is nutritionally balanced to provide support for each aspect of your health that needs it.

During this episode, Teri shares what the Wildatarian diet consists of and how you can find out whether it’s right for you. She talks about fat malabsorption in detail, and explains some of the body indicators. Then she talks us through a typical day in the life of someone following the Wildatarian diet and shares with us what she ate before coming on the show.

Teri is a firm believer and supporter that women should take charge of their own bodies starting at any age. If something doesn’t feel right to you, take control, feel empowered, and start investigating for yourself. You’re never too old to start having good health again!

Have you ever been told your child was going to be unwell for their entire lives? Do you know if your body can absorb fat? What empowers you to take control of your health?

In This Episode:

  • How holistic and alternative medicine can have a more positive impact on wellness than mainstream medicine
  • Why having a high stress level during pregnancy can impact your unborn child
  • How eliminating certain foods from your child’s diet can help solve their health problems
  • Why your period might stop
  • How the Wildatarian diet can help chronic medical conditions
  • How protein, fat, and sulphates can negatively impact your body
  • Why stress has such a negative impact on your gut
  • What the indicators of fat malabsorption are
  • Why kind of food is on the Wildatarian diet
  • Why you should feel empowered to understand your body at any age

 

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Quotes:

“Epinephrine will open up the tight junctions of your gut, it will make you further fat malabsorbed, it will push fat into your lymph, which will then back up bad bacteria and viruses.” (17:19)

“I’m adrenally sensitive and one cup of coffee a day can actually support my adrenal function. I also support my adrenals through breathwork, daily exercise, an hourly reboot where I just close my eyes for a minute every hour between my clients.”  (28:11)

“We have to be self-advocates for our bodies. And I now, at 57, feel more in control than I did as a 40 year old, and I’m in better health, and my clinical reports show that. It’s really up to us to take it back! To be empowered! Just because we’re women over 50 doesn’t mean that we have to give up on ourselves!” (30:07)

 

Links:

Find Teri CochraneOnline |Facebook |Instagram |Twitter

Pick upThe Wildatarian Kickstart Detox

Join the KetoGreen Community on Facebook

Buy The Hormone Fix

 

Transcript:

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
It's really up to us to take it back, be empowered. Just because we're women over 50, doesn't mean that we have to give up on ourselves, or women in our 40s, or even women in our 20s where we're struggling with hormones. We can understand our bodies and really be empowered to listen, tune in, and then, stop, drop and roll the thinking processes of less than or comparison or whatever. We can really shift this tide.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Well, hello everyone, and welcome back to Couch Talk. Your intimate place for intimate conversation, shamelessly and guiltlessly. And today, we're really going to delve deep into diets. And what's the hottest trending diets, of course, you have heard about my keto green way of doing things. And today, I'm going to bring you the Wildatarian way of doing things. So we're going to have some fun here in discussion with a colleague of mine, Teri Cochran. So I'd like to introduce you to Teri. She's an internationally known health expert, specializing in complex chronic conditions, as well as bringing elite performers to their highest potential. She recently authored the Amazon number one new release book, "The Wildatarian diet: living as nature intended". Teri lives in the metro DC area and is in practice there.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Today, we're just going to dig into what really is affecting our metabolism, what is keeping us stuck and weight loss resistance, and how we can conquer that and overcome that aspect of our frustration. Especially in women, as we get older. Always looking at what is the next right step, what are the tweaks that I need to make? Or what are some of the big leaps I need to make to really shift my metabolism, shift my health. It's more about than about looking good, it's about feeling good. And getting in touch with how God designed us, getting in touch with our natural habitat, and our natural composition, and our passions, and our goals and going for them. When we have our health, we can have a million wishes, right? When we don't have our health, we only have one wish, to get our health. Let's dig in deep. And I'm bringing in Teri, how are you, Teri? Great to see you here today.

Teri Cochrane:
Great to see you, Anna, so happy to be with your tribe, and all the women across the country that are viewing this today.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Yes, absolutely. So give us a little bit about your background, your story, what brought you to this point?

Teri Cochrane:
I'd love to share that. If you would've asked me 15 years ago, or 20 years ago, would you be in the world of healthcare, being a health instructor, I would have said, "What?" I ran a business unit for Freddie Mac and their multifamily division. So I was charged with the health and wealth of the multifamily portfolio, billions and billions of dollars of assets. I was a risk manager, a strategic planner. And little did I know that those skill sets would turn into being a risk manager for my son's health.

Teri Cochrane:
My firstborn, by the age of three, we were told he would have brain seizures, he wouldn't be normal and he wouldn't grow past five foot four. I live in the DC area, as you mentioned, and I availed myself of the top endocrinologist, pediatricians, allergists and all they said was, "You're going to have a broken child, deal with it, and here's some more steroids, here's some more antibiotics, here's some more bronchodilators." By the age of five, I said, "I've had enough." I started seeking solutions.

Teri Cochrane:
I had a day job, which was managing that risk of those billions of dollars of assets. In the evening, I became a detective for trying to find the solution to my son's health. This is before the age of the internet. I had books upon books piled on my kitchen table. I would seek out mothers, I would be this rabid researcher and observer of those all around me. I had an epiphany, it's, "Oh my gosh, it's what we're feeding him." That jettisoned me into looking at food and how food really affects our health.

Teri Cochrane:
Fast forward 15 years later, I've developed my Cochrane Method, which is a unique methodology on how to look at the body, just as you said, how God designed us, and we're all different. We start with genetics, and we look at how those genes get tripped. It can be environmental, it can be pathogenic, it could be emotional, or even a physical impact. I just saw somebody yesterday, we were able to discern her scoliosis because she tripped in Disney World.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
With that, go back. How many years ago? Was it that your son was born? How old is he now?

Teri Cochrane:
He was born in 1994, so he'll be 25.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Congratulations. That's awesome. Now, how tall did it get to be?

Teri Cochrane:
Well, he ended up being 5'11, a Junior Olympic gold medalist, valedictorian on a full ride to a private Ivy. He was a scholar at UVA. He's a singer, musician, and just all around great guy.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
That is awesome. Well, thank God for you being his mommy advocate and wellness advocate. That's the one thing that at Emory, when I thought my oldest was having some absence seizures, and I was feeling like, "Okay, I'm just hitting a wall here." And someone said, "You're the only one who can advocate for your child. And you are the only one who can advocate for your own health. Don't expect someone else to do it for you." If you intuitively feel that, "Okay, something's off." I'm going to look for answers. And that's so important to hear. I want everyone listening to hear, because trust your intuition.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
I want like, Michael like yours, Teri's like to empower each individual to have that responsibility and control back. Because ultimately, I always say, we can't ever be Mother Nature. I want to dig into this a little bit, if you don't mind. So okay. 1994, how was your pregnancy with him? Like thinking, what were some of the triggers? Let's dig at that. Because that's what we do in medicine and functional medicine. With my experience, I would see a patient coming in and I'm like, "Okay, well, what was your pregnancy like? What was your health of your mother when you were in utero?" I don't care if that woman's 50 years old. It still matters to me, because those are messages that are constantly being sent. Can we dig into that a little bit too, to uncover some of this and part of your exploration?

Teri Cochrane:
I love it. You're the first person that's actually on a podcast or any social media that has asked me that. I think that is a brilliant question. I was 32 years old, I was fit, I was healthy. I was in an emotionally abusive marriage. My autonomic nervous system response was on hyper alert at all times. I didn't know at the time, but I now know that I'm compound heterozygous for the MTH of our gene expression, which means that I was low in progesterone. I was put on bed rest for the last 10 weeks of my pregnancy. Because I was in fight or flight, I delivered six weeks early.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
I want to unpack that a little bit more, because that's huge. What we'll do will live off our child's adrenalin starting at that time. That constant high cortisol to low cortisol. Cortisol is the key that unlocks the gate in our healthy membranes. Like we think of zonula, well how does zonula get there? Well cortisol is the key that unlocks the gate to allow these intruders in, so to speak. In utero your son, intestines became fragile. This of course, I'm saying this as a detective. There's no mama guilt here. I always say, "God forgive me." God says, "Forgive you for what?"

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Let's establish that but understanding this helps, I'm an obstetrician, helps generations of women. We have to understand this, this is so powerful, Teri. Thank you, first of all, for sharing this. Because it is a vulnerable time period, what you went through. Just like your health right there, thinking the trauma that was for you, just from an emotionally abusive marriage to being on bed rest and feeling like, that I have taken care of many of women on bed rest. I personally wanted to be on bed rest, but that never happened.

Teri Cochrane:
It's so important that you said that because the labor was traumatic, it was 18 hours. My ex, he's now my ex, came to the hospital late, told me I wasn't in labor and left. I labored by myself for 18 hours. I actually called my parents who were living in Florida at the time, and they got on the first plane. I felt very alone during that laboring time and I was pushing cortisol, like nobody's missing side. I was abandoned. My son and, your brilliant because his, I had to create an archetype for William, he was adrenal. Because he didn't have the natural corticosteroids to manage the inflammatory response that was happening in his body, life threatening asthma, bleeding eczema, really just all sorts of allergies. Truly, his adrenals were his root cause, if you will, adrenal gut excess.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Interesting. Were you given pitocin during labor?

Teri Cochrane:
Yes, I was.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Did you end up delivering vaginally or by C section?

Teri Cochrane:
Vaginally.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
That's a really good thing. Now we're looking at high dose pitocin as a risk factor for autism. It's interesting to understand that. My work, Teri, is that the cortisol oxytocin connection disconnection. The thing is that you had chronic stress, creating additional feelings of isolation. I mean, realistic, and physiologic feelings of isolation that created. Here, living off child's adrenals during your pregnancy to survive. Because we have to survive, and then his susceptibility. Were you able to breastfeed?

Teri Cochrane:
Yes, I breastfed for about three months, but I went right back to work. Interestingly enough, for his first 18 months, he seemed to be thriving. He did have a little eczema on his face, but he seemed to be thriving. Because he has the vulnerable genetic makeup, he had a bad compound heterozygous, he had two genetic polymorphous for sulfur processing. Which we now know it's linked to asthma, it's linked to eczema. It's linked to gut impairment. He also had that cytochrome P450 family of genes, which made him a really poor detoxifier. By the age of three, he was regularly administered 60 milligrams of prednisone, for a body that was 40 pounds. It just literally continued to rack his adrenals. Prednisolone and bronchodilators. He was hyper stimulated, those poor little adrenals that were already based on my pregnancy underperforming, were given just massive doses of androgenic hormones that further deplete adrenal function long term.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
And affect the GI tract, yet again, increasing intestinal permeability. It's excellent that he had three months of breast milk, too. Then, did he show dairy intolerance symptoms?

Teri Cochrane:
He did. He actually, when we figured it out, it was wheat, corn, dairy, and peanuts and citrus. Citrus, because he responded to hyper acidity, which exacerbated the bleeding eczema. By fourth grade I was called by social services because I thought I was beating my child because he would come into school bloodied every day because of the bleeding eczema.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Teri, oh my god.

Teri Cochrane:
Of course, it didn't happen. He was significantly impaired.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Now, we save that beatings for the teenage years in my opinion. Yeah, that's huge. Continue on in the discovery process here that you went through. And thank you again for sharing this.

Teri Cochrane:
Of course. Again, I had the epiphany, oh my goodness. How is it affecting his physiology? Within five days of eliminating those five foods that I mentioned, he started breathing. The dark allergic shiners were going away. The peanuts were a big deal for him. Because it turned out with all those steroids, is he created a significant mold toxicity. We know that peanuts are an aflatoxin. I call them a fire starter of hell, in terms of how it affects, it trips genes and it makes the mold exacerbate.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Let's touch on that, too. Because I want to make that connection, chronic steroids use increases glucose which feeds yeast. Candida makes us more mold susceptible despite our environment. Plus, the kids also can have label personalities, great one minute, on edge the next. Irritable get very hungry, low blood sugar reactions. That swinging kind of personality. If that fits anyone listening, this is what we need to do. Then also dairy is always a big thing, any congestion, as my ear infections, dairy, eliminate. I mean, I will say there's no milk you should drink other than your momma's breast milk.

Teri Cochrane:
That's absolutely true. He was experiencing all of that. He had a very, very stable personality, very inquisitive and quiet child. He never really manifested any neurological dysfunction. Other than literally, his body was in fight or flight, but it wasn't affecting him as he went through school. He was very, very good in school. Obviously, he did really well. Truly, by the fourth grade, I had really figured it out. I quit my job when he was 10. Then I went back to school, and 15 years later, this is where we are. He was my first and most important client.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Yeah. Continue on in the journey now then coming to bridge us to the Wildatarian approach that you now advocate.

Teri Cochrane:
My son actually is now perfectly healthy and has no residual asthma. He can eat anything. He's wonderful, he stays away from peanuts, but he's a wonderful and really robust and he's a foodie. What happened was, as my son was getting better, my daughter became critically ill when she was 15. Because a wisdom tooth extraction turned into brain sepsis. She was a pre-professional ballerina. Nine months later, she was administered the wrong supplement at a ballet conservatory and she went liver toxic and went into liver shock.

Teri Cochrane:
Her gut was already very permeable from the Clindamycin that saved her life and I'm grateful for that. Then the liver shock really undid her. At that point, she was my healthy child. She went into complete autonomic nervous system disorder. Lost her period for 18 months, started losing her hair. She started having Cushing's like symptoms. She started having POTS like symptoms. No one around the country, and I took her to some of the best endocrinologists in the bay area. She was a genetic mystery. That's what delve me into genes.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Back up one second here. She went completely amenorrhea, so hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis dysfunction. The hormone stimulators weren't communicating with the ovaries in this instance. She had, had a again, susceptibility because of the clindamycin, leaves this vulnerability to our most important. I tend to think of the microbiome as an organ in and of itself. A living breathing organ. That's completely wiped out, leaving that susceptibility to then another attack that caused her liver which detoxifies all our hormones to be impaired. Then did she have, let me understand, toxic liver enzymes, what else was-

Teri Cochrane:
Enzymes, and she had a C4A in the levels sets of a bio toxin in the 12 thousands. She had candida and then she had the Epstein-Barr virus.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
She got a whammy from all of dimensions. We look at triggers, and then we look at these consequences or say, trigger collaborators. I don't know, is there a better term for it?

Teri Cochrane:
I might say collaborators.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Trigger collaborators. I mean, it was a combination of things.

Teri Cochrane:
What I found was that this trigger collaborators express their genetic makeup, which then the MTHFR, especially to C677T, holding amorphism for a methylation was stopping her body's ability to produce bile salts. She was recirculating estrogen. So then more fat metabolism malabsorption occurred. She had multiple sulfur processing genes. That hit her autonomic nervous system because she also has the COMT genes which goes to catecholamines. Again, back to that dopamine metabolism. She was stuck in epinephrine. She was in that hyper autonomic nervous system response, I now call epinephrine, the cupcake and I coined what she was going through, the ballerina syndrome. Having her be a ballerina. Because not only was she going through that, but as a ballerina, the body is taxed in that fight or flight. Because you are pushing the body six, seven, eight hours beyond what is natural, and it is pushing epinephrine.

Teri Cochrane:
What I found through medical research, and then clinical outcomes in my practice, is that epinephrine will open up the tight junctions of your gut. It will make you for their fat mal-absorb, it will push that into your lymph. Which will then back up the bacteria and the viruses she was carrying. It increases the pathogenicity of the bacteria and the viruses and anything that's in your microbiome naturally. It was a fire starter.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
That's a good example, fire starter. Also again, the reason her period stopped too, during this, it's important. Because when we're stressed and especially like athletes, there's the athletic triad. There's that risk of losing your period. Becoming amenorrhea, bone loss, among other things. We're experiencing that constant push to cortisol. We got to survive. We're making adrenaline, epinephrine. We're making cortisol. To a point your body says, "Okay, you're frying me out, I'm putting the brakes on you."

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
That's something to understand, but even though those brakes are coming on, we're not continuing down the pathways to make estrogen, testosterone, and we're also depleting our progesterone. We see many women stop their periods in this type of situation. That's high stress. She's had other things going on too. I want to ask you this too, because about the oxytocin, cortisol connection disconnection thing. Did she have depression? Did she feel isolated? Was she disconnecting?

Teri Cochrane:
She was, and actually this is when we were going through what I call our uncoupling in my marriage. There was yet that added stressor. She was a child who was happy, beautifully. She was angelic. And she's still, you know, a happy young lady. She's now turning 21 next week, and things have all turned around. That was a rough time because again, the biochemistry of her was taking over and especially with candida and her candida was really high. And now we know that candida will disrupt that dopamine mechanism. The candida was feeding the dopamine disruption. Then she has another gene for oxalic metabolism.

Teri Cochrane:
These are healthy foods. This is almond and coconut. You take her off dairy, you put her on these other alternate milks. That wasn't working for her. Then the oxalates create aspergillus which is mold, which creates biofilm which then feeds the virus of the Epstein-Barr. It became this perfect storm. My Wildatarian protocol really, put her back on track. I didn't develop the Wildatarian protocol for her, I actually developed it for a gentleman who had end stage cancer.

Teri Cochrane:
That was a rare form called amyloidosis were amyloids, these truncated protein structures had wrapped around his heart. Two rounds of chemo had sent him into congestive heart and kidney failure. He was given his last rites. They heard about me, I didn't know about amyloids back then. It was seven years ago and I started researching, I'm a nerd. I realized it was the food supply that was linking this. Within three months, his life changed, which was a marker for amyloidosis. They were normal. Now, he's cancer free, seven years later. That really helped me link the fact that amyloids feed viruses, amyloids create biofilm, biofilm, feeds the candida. The biofilm, well they play back and forth. I call it the ping pong syndrome.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Let's explain biofilm first, again, may be a new term for a lot of people.

Teri Cochrane:
I call biofilm a doughnut. Biofilm is a fat soluble protective mechanism for Lyme disease, for candida. Because these little bacteria, I call them cowards. They surround themselves with this doughnut, it's a fatty substance, a fatty gel like substance that is biofilm. Trying to eradicate a bacteria with antibacterials when there's this big fat doughnut, when this big fat doughnut is protecting them. The doughnut has expressed our genes and now we can't metabolize fats, if we have that COMT gene or the DDR gene or the APOE gene or whatever gene that you have, or might have. There's an expressed, because these bugs are so smart, and they're going to say, "Ha-ha. We're going to make it even harder for you to break down that biofilm."

Teri Cochrane:
That biofilm will feed viral load, then you got a problem. The Wildatarian approach, what it does is, it seeks to limit foods that increase amyloids. It seeks to limit food that increases biofilm through the fungal metabolites of corn and peanuts. Even pea protein, that has become so popular. If you've had a history of any kind of fungal infection, or candida or strep, that pea protein could be again, a fire starter to that biofilm creation which is then going to fortify those pathogens, expressor genes, and therefore you have symptom-ology.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
That's fascinating. Let's talk about the Wildatarian protocol.

Teri Cochrane:
My Wildatarian protocol, kind of putting it in layman's terms. I had figured out that the three big players, protein, fat and salt malabsorption is kicking our butts. This is a diet that is based on your genetic blueprint and your current state of health. You don't have to be a biochemist or a super nerd like me to figure out what's going on. We have developed a quiz that is very consumer friendly, that we call Body Talk. For example, if you have trouble building muscle, if you burn after you eat, if you get lightheaded. If you have trouble with sugar handling mechanisms, you have protein in your urine. As a result, you have low protein levels or high protein levels on your annual checkup?

Teri Cochrane:
More than likely you're going to have a protein issue, protein handling issue. If you have a history of asthma, if you have a history of arthritis, if you have a history of mental health disorders. If you are sensitive to sulfites and nitrates. If you have a family history of gut, IDD, IBS, Crohn's ulcerative colitis, that's a big sulfur player. We stay asparagus is a tattletale. You smell asparagus coming out, you more than likely have a sulfur sensitivity. We have become hyper sulfur sensitive in the United States. Because the glyphosate, that is the roundup that we spray on our crops, stops the body's ability to process sulfur. It stops in its tracks. We need sulfur. Sulfur is important for our collagen matrix structure, for our bones, for mental health, for gut health. Everything that I just said is-

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
For estrogen detoxification, for all of our processes. That's very important. That's interesting. You're saying, if your urine smells like asparagus.

Teri Cochrane:
That's a tattletale. It says you're not processing sulfur appropriately. Then the third one is stat. And this is back to what I call the cupcake, which is our epinephrine, which is our adrenaline, which is our stress response. As I noted through the ballerina syndrome, stress is going to kick our butt. It's going to weak our gut, it's going to make us fat mal-absorb, it's going to increase the pathogenicity of our viri, as I call it, viri, and bacteria and fungal organisms that we have that might be playing happily in our playground of our gut biome, and all of a sudden become bullies in the sandbox.

Teri Cochrane:
How do we know if you're predisposed to being fat mal-absorb or if you have acne. If you have hormone imbalance, because what our hormones, they're fat soluble. If you have an insulin handling issue. If you have a floating stool and it's fluffy, if it's light colored. If you've had your gallbladder taken out. That's a fat malabsorption issue. Asking the body to give us feedback. It's body talk, I'm your body interpreter and I teach you to become your own body interpreter. I really consider myself an educator, anyone that comes to my practice, when we graduate them, and that is our goal, to graduate our clients. They're fully educated in how their body is talking to them. Therefore, they can make those early warning pivots so they don't fall down the rabbit hole.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Yeah, that's so critical, and I love that you emphasize that. Let's talk about your Quick Start Detox. I know we're offering that to our clients today. So it is going to be found, she's got a great Wildatarian kickstart detox. That's going to be at tericochrane.com/wildatarian-kickstart-detox/annacabeca. We'll have that links from the show notes here as well. But tell us about that.

Teri Cochrane:
Yes, this is a seven day detox that I really formulated to really help you know, as we talked about Anna, hormones have to be detoxified by the liver and then the lymphatic system and eventually our gut. If we are backing up with toxins, and some of our toxins can be healthy foods. I say, some healthy foods could be kicking your butt. Chicken and broccoli could be poison on a plate for you, depending on your genetic makeup and your current state of health. You'll take the quiz, you'll find out what kind of Wildatarian you are. And that seven day detox speaks to that.

Teri Cochrane:
And it really takes away all of those, what I call fire starters. We're going to, no peas, no peanuts. Right now, it'll just be fish and low micro-toxin and beans. We really go to the Pinto and the chick, those that don't really ferment. We speak to looking at using the prebiotics of asparagus and artichokes, those that are not FOSs which have saccharides in them. Which could affect and irritate that candida or that fungus that you might have in your system.

Teri Cochrane:
We've had phenomenal feedback, even from my clients. We've had a lot of people that have taken it across the country, but the feedback from my clients is, "Can you do another detox here? This is amazing. I really love it." And even though they're so well informed with me, and they work with me personally, just doing that seven days, just really is like a Claritin clear commercial. It's very doable, and it's sustainable. It's a sustainable plan that you could incorporate any time of year.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Give us a day in the life of a Wildatarian.

Teri Cochrane:
Yeah, so I'll give you a day in the life of Teri Cochrane's Wildatarian. I am a WS Wildatarian, meaning that sulfur is a really big bad boy for me. This morning I had an egg-white omelet with some cilantro and some goat cheese. Then for lunch, I had some duck fennel sausage and some Japanese sweet potatoes and some eggplant. And tonight, I'm going to have some oysters and I'm going to have some sweet potato fries. It's Friday night and I might have a little bit, I may go to this place called, Duck Taco, they have some ducks and duck tacos in a lettuce wrap.

Teri Cochrane:
I love my fat so I eat butter like cheese. I put a little butter in my low mold coffee. Because coffee can be really high mold. And because I'm adrenaly sensitive, one cup of coffee a day is actually supports my adrenal function. I support my adrenals with breath work, I support it with daily exercise. I support it with an hourly reboot where I just close my eyes for a minute every hour between my clients to really help reset that HPA access for me. You don't have to be super skilled in the kitchen to become a Wildatarian. Last night I had tuna. I've had bison earlier in the week with some asparagus and some of the orange sweet potatoes. I love sweet potatoes because they provide me that progesterone that I need. Because chew up progesterone throughout my day, is I use so much cortisol in my daily practice. Because I see all my clients throughout the day.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
Yeah, very cool. Very good. I love the menu, oysters are one of my favorite food. One of my super food. It's one of my friendly foods. I love that one, also. One thing that just you know, and very similar to the Keto Greenaway is that just for being proponent for intermittent fasting, no snacking. I didn't hear you mentioned snacking all day or anything like that. I'm really glad, Teri and just acknowledging like, okay, we're living a lifestyle. How do we work within our lifestyle to really enhance our health at the same time and maintain our health. Because we have to be poured into in order to pour out and serve. That's key, I honor you for what you're doing. And I thank you for being with us here today. Any final message you want to leave with our audience of avid listeners?

Teri Cochrane:
Yes, I would love to. One of the things is, everything we've talked about, it can be pretty scary. Food supply is not as nutrient rich as it used to be. We're dealing with environmental toxins. We have an epidemic of chronic autoimmune conditions. What I want to leave your audience with, is a message of hope. Because we can take control. This is what I loved what you said earlier, we have to be self-advocates for our bodies. I now, as a 57 year old, feel more robust than I did as a 40 year old, and I'm in better health. Actually, my clinical reports show that. It's really up to us to take it back, be empowered. Just because we're women over 50, doesn't mean that we have to give up on ourselves, or women in our 40s or even women in our 20s, we're struggling with hormones. We can understand our bodies and really be empowered to listen, tune in. And then stop, drop and roll the thinking processes of less than or comparison or whatever, we can really shift this tide.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
I completely agree with you. One of the things that I do, do regularly is read my morning devotional called, Give Us This Day. It's a beautiful devotional, and in it each day, there's the blessed of the day. This blessed of the day is typically someone who's done something amazing. Well, so many women in this list of the day, post childbearing years. I created orphanages, I created hospitals, went through other missions. They just continue to create and listen to that small still voice within us which says, "This is what you would really love to do and I want to help you do it." Never give up on yourselves, I second that. Always know that you have the power within you to reverse these conditions. In my story, I was told I was menopausal and permanently irreversibly infertile. I have a child and I went through menopause two times. Never give up hope and I love that you say that. Teri, thank you so much for being with us.

Dr. Anna Cabeca:
And to our listeners, thank you all for being here today. This is a fabulous episode and I really want you to share it. Because someone in your life, if you or someone in your life is struggling with frustration, a diagnosis or your children aren't thriving. Just share this message, share this podcast. Whether you're listening to us on iTunes or Podcast Addict, Google, wherever you listen to us. Be sure to subscribe, and share and I thank you all for being here with us today. Visit my blog for more information and also the show notes at doctoranna.com, D-R-A-N-N-A dot com. Thank you all.

Anna Cabeca
Anna Cabeca

Anna Cabeca, D.O., FACOG, ABOIM, ABAARM